Results from GCAT undergraduates

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Results from GCAT Undergraduates


Here are some sample data from Mary Lee Ledbetter's undergraduate lab at Holy Cross. These data were obtained with the same RNA sample, so all spots "should" be equal (i.e. yellow). Scans were conducted twice to obtain faint signals (long exposure) and to prevent saturation of the CCD camera (short exposure). The RNA was isolated from exponential phase cells grown aerobically on glucose. ISB slide number was 2828

Source Cy3 Tiff File Cy5 Tiff File
Long Exposure

MLL2828L.jpg

MLL2828_L_w595.tif

MLL2828_L_w685.tif

Short Exposure

MLL2828 S.jpg

MLL2828_w595.tif

MLL2828_w685.tif


Davidson College, NC (Dr. A. Malcolm Campbell, faculty advisor)

  • Danniel Choi's ('04) Bar Code Microarray - Pilot Study Media:Choi_2004.pps (1.6 MB PowerPoint Slide Show file) (Sedond place, 2004 North Carolina Academy of Sciences - collegiate division)
  • Emilyh Oldham's ('03) Honors research on Microarray sources of variation Media:EOldham.ppt (500 kb power point file) (first place, too3 Horth Carolina Academy of Science - Collegiate division)
  • Dan Pierce's ('03) research on improving and quantifying signal variation Media:DPierce.ppt (1.2 MB powerpoint file) (Third place, 2003 North Carolina Academy of Sciences - collegiate division)


Pomona College, CA (Dr. Laura Hoopes, faculty advisor)

  • 12 students working in 5 groups examined DNA replication mutants v. wild-type


Missouri Western State College, MO (Dr. Todd Eckdahl, Faculty Advisor)

  • Five students examined effects of minor groove bindng agents

MWSC Student Presentations for 2000-2001 academic year (* denotes undergraduate authors):

  1. Hansen*, Edward L. "Using Microarray Technology to Measure Effects of Minor Groove Binding Drugs on Gene Expression in Yeast." Oral Presentation at the Missouri Academy of Science, Collegiate Division, April 20, 2001, Missouri Southern State College, 2nd place award.
  2. Eckdahl, Todd T, David Ash*, and Brianna Peterson*, "Using Microarray Technology in the Undergraduate Laboratory." Oral Presention at the Missouri Academy of Science, Senior Division, April 20, 2001, Missouri Southern State College.
  3. Brown*, Abby. "Single Gene and Genome Wide Expression Analysis of Glucose and Galactose Metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisae." Poster Presentation at the Beta Beta Beta NC-2 District Convention, April 28, 2001, Reis Biological Station.
  4. Hansen*, Edward L. "Using Microarray Technology to Measure Effects of Minor Groove Binding Drugs on Gene Expression in Yeast." Oral Presentation at the Beta Beta Beta NC-2 District Convention, April 28, 2001, Reis Biological Station.


Muhlenberg College, PA (Dr. Denise Wallack, faculty advisor)

  • 10 students examined the following conditions:
  • (filled in soon)


Swarthmore College, PA (Dr. Liz Vallen, faculty advisor)

  • 6 students examined DNA replication mutant V. wild-type


Mount Saint Mary's College, MD (Dr. Myra Derbyshire, faculty advisor)

  • 8 students examined mutants that affect chromatin structure V. wild-type
  • results presented at the Pennsylvania Academy of Science meeting in April, 2001

Microarray expression analysis of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae hst3 hst4 double mutant

Dr. Myra K. Derbyshire1, Daniel J. Koppers1, Marlon G. Lawrence1, Heather L. Offutt1, Loretta M. Rathvon1, Harriete L. Sanderson1, Nabil A., Shafi1, Michael F. Smith1, Megan E. Walsh1, Dr. Jeffery Strathern2 1Genetics class. Mount Saint Mary's College, Emmitsburg, Maryland. 2NCI-Frederick Cancer Research and Development Center, Frederick, Maryland.

The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2 family of genes consists of SIR2 and four SIR2-related genes (HST1- HST4). The SIR2 gene product is a key regulator of gene expression believed to help form modified chromatin structures on the genes it regulates. SIR2 is important for the structure of the nucleolus, for repressing gene expression near chromosome telomeres and at special sequences involved in cell-type differentiation. HST1-HST4 gene products may modify chromatin structure at different chromosomal locations from those regulated by SIR2. S. cerevisiae hst3 hst4 double mutants have low viability, defective telomeric silencing, and altered cell-cycle progression. A hst3::kanMX4 (Saccharomyces Deletion Research Project, #11801) was crossed to a hst4::kanMX4 strain (#3350). The gene expression patterns of two meiotic segregants (HST3 HST4, hst3 hst4) were compared. Microarray technology was made possible through affiliation with GCAT (Genome Consortium for Active Teaching).


California Lutheran University, CA (Dr. Denis Revie, faculty advisor)

  • 6 students examined anaerobic V. aerobic, and three concentrations of peroxide


Lycoming College, PA (Dr. jeff Nerman, faculty advisor)

  • 8 students examined growth conditions and harsh growth conditions


University of Southern Colorado (Dr. Dan Caprioglio, faculty advisor)

  • students examined effects of drug treatments


Carleton College, MN (Dr. Stephan Zweifel, faculty advisor)

  • students examined effects of rich and minimum media




GCATmembers thank Drs. Pat Brown, David Botstein, Barbara Dunn, and the other members of the Stanford Microarray Database for their generosity in allowing undergraduate data to be included in their database. We also thank Pat Brown and members of his lab for producing the yeast microarrays for our use. Without this support, GCAT would not have been so successful in its first year of existence.





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